Watch Alaska City Celebrate the 4th of July by Hurling 13 Cars off a Cliff

Glacier View River Retreat

  • Glacier View River Retreat near Anchorage, Alaska, hosts a charming event every July 4th: dropping cars, trucks and RVs off a cliff and down 300 feet to their doom.
  • The tradition started in the early 2000s, when someone hit a puddle and had to dispose of the wrecked vehicle. That someone had an imagination, and it was all uphill from there.
  • They love the outdoors in Alaska, so it goes without saying that when the holiday is over, what’s left of the vehicles is taken for recycling.

    This Fourth of July tradition is an Evel Knievel, a little Demolition Derby, and 100 percent awesome. Where other cities gather to watch fireworks and eat hot dogs to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Alaskans in and around Anchorage travel to the Glacier View River Retreat in Glacier View, Alaska, to see the cars of are dropped from a height of 300 feet. rock You do not believe me? See for yourself:

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    No Alaskans were harmed in the making of this video. In fact, the car launch system is completely isolated. Car and Driver spoke with Arnie Hrncir, one of the founders of Glacier View River Retreat and organizer of the event, and he explained that they have two launch rails: one with a rail that attaches to the steering arm and another where they tie the steering wheel straight with straps harpoon and open the throttle.

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    As if that wasn’t cool enough, the cars have been painted with some weird paint jobs. Many of the 13 vehicles that rolled off the cliff this year featured red, white and blue along with patriotic slogans, but others were customized to represent the community. Above are pictures of some of the cars courtesy of Ice Monkey Garage, a local custom shop.

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    Some even came from Reno, Nevada, as part of the carnage caravan. This one below was painted by residents of Palmer’s Maple Springs, a nursing and rehabilitation community outside of Anchorage.

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    Glacier’s Fourth of July car launch started in 2005, according to Hrncir, and it started in a way that can only happen in Alaska. In 2003, his wife hit an apple in their Volvo and eventually he got tired of working on the car. What to do with a totaled Volvo? Put a rock in the trunk and run off a cliff. Naturally.

    Now, however, it has evolved over the years to become an Independence Day event dedicated to what Hrncir calls an “F-Day.”

    “F-Day means it’s freedom, faith, family, food and fun,” he said. “We’re having a birthday party. [for the U.S.].”

    He also emphasized the importance of honoring veterans at the event, noting that they appreciate veterans’ contributions to this country “over and over” throughout the day.

    View of the Fourth of July Glacier drive-in

    Glacier View River Retreat

    After the birthday party is over, the cars are loaded onto 18-wheelers and taken away for recycling, because the second best way to celebrate America the Beautiful—after car sales, of course—is to honor its natural beauty. holding it. clean.

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